Citizen Charter- ccnpp

Program introduction

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Citizens’ Charter

The citizens’ Charter national priority program which has been started on the 5th April of 2016, is a foundation for realizing the government’s self-reliance vision. It is a promise of partnership between the Afghan state and its thousands of communities. The Charter is a government commitment to provide every village and city in Afghanistan with basic services, based on community’s own prioritization. Built around the use of united community-level budgeting and financial reporting, under the Charter, communities oversee their own development goals, monitor the quality of service delivery, and report grievances to authorities and civil society. The Charter promotes inclusive development and accountability at all governance levels. It gives a voice to vulnerable groups such as women, returnees, and the poor. And it provides a positive Afghan government presence in areas that have previously only known lawlessness and poverty.

The Citizens’ Charter was first introduced in the “Realizing Self Reliance” policy paper. Afghanistan has over 15 years of successful community development experience, most notably from the NSP, but also from other government and non-governmental programs that have built partnerships with communities. These successful partnerships underpin the Citizens’ Charter, which will transform individual projects into a sustainable program across Afghanistan.

Community Development Councils:

Community Development Councils (CDCs) are the heart of the Citizen’s Charter. They are tasked with planning, negotiating, and managing development investments. Through NSP, 35,000 CDCs were established across Afghanistan. They implemented nearly $2 billion dollars of infrastructure projects, with an average return on investment of 35% and almost 30% of their costs and labor being contributed by communities themselves, a reliable sign of their popularity at the grassroots. The Councils are trained in financial management and bookkeeping, and in basic principles of transparency, participation, and accountability. Independent evaluations repeatedly showed that no other project could approach NSP’s ability to provide cost-effective, large-scale service delivery even in hard-to-reach parts of rural Afghanistan.

Through the Citizens’ Charter, CDCs are democratically elected and trained to implement basic development projects. Grants for the projects are transferred directly from the Ministry of Finance to each individual community bank account. With the oversight of the Ministry of Rural Rehabilitation and Development (MRRD) in rural areas and the Independent Directorate for Local Governance in urban areas, CDCs directly implement project in their own village.

Minimum Service Standards:

One of the things which makes Citizen’s Charter different from its predecessor National Solidarity Program is the Minimum Service Standers. Unlike, NSP though Citizen’s Charter the whole community will have minimum of defined and set standards and will have access to basic services. These services are monitored and reported on by communities through citizens’ Scorecards. Services provided through the Charter will include:

Migration Response:

The Citizens’ Charter provides services, jobs, and enable better reintegration in areas of high return. The Citizens’ Charter follows a total area development model, which means returnees, IDPs, and host community will all benefit from the interventions. Funds will be made available to every community to provide basic services for returnees, IDPs and host communities – preventing a competition over resources. The Maintenance and Construction Cash Grant (MCCG) program within the Charter, will provide seasonal, labor-intensive paying jobs for more than one third of the households in villages, targeting the poorest households in areas of high return so that they have a cushion to tide them over the lean season.

urban areas and rural areas

Livestock and Agriculture:

The Community Agriculture and Live Stock Project (CLAP) aims to increase agricultural and livestock productivity, and improve food security, for almost 170,000 rural households in selected districts of Kabul, Parwan and Logar provinces. The project also aims to reduce gender disparities by increasing the social and economic status of women. CLAP focuses on enhancing productive assets, skills, services, technologies and income opportunities in the targeted households. The target group includes small-scale farmers and livestock-keepers, including landless households; women and female-headed households; and resettled and nomadic Kuchi people. The project consists of three following components:

(a) Community Development:

Including productive Infrastructures and Institutional Strengthening: This component aims at strengthening the capacity of local communities by supporting the construction of small-scale infrastructure aimed at enhancing agricultural productivity, as well as the capacity of community organizations and local government agencies to address issues of ownership and sustainability.

(b) Livestock and Agriculture Development:

This component aims at reducing poverty and enhancing food security. Strong emphasis will be placed on women-headed households and the most vulnerable and marginalized individuals within the rural communities by introducing appropriate livestock and agricultural practices and packages, and, to limited extent, supporting value-chain development and linkages to markets.

(c) Project Management:

Policy Support, and Young Professionals Program: This component aims at enhancing Project coordination providing technical support to the project support Team. The project shall also finance Young Professionals Program as well as the Policy Support Fund and Special Financing Facility.

CLAP is funded by International Fund for Agriculture Development (IFAD) and implemented by Ministry of Agriculture, Irrigation and Livestock (MAIL). The Ministry of Agriculture, Irrigation and Livestock (MAIL) and Ministry of Rural Rehabilitation and Development (MRRD) has signed a Memorandum of Understanding, where MRRD through Citizens’ Charter program will provide technical assistance for implementation CLAP’s component one.

Minimum Service Standards:

One of the things which makes Citizen’s Charter different from its predecessor National Solidarity Program is the Minimum Service Standers. Unlike, NSP though Citizen’s Charter the whole community will have minimum of defined and set standards and will have access to basic services. These services are monitored and reported on by communities through citizens’ Scorecards. Services provided through the Charter will include.

Support for CASA1000:

The Central Asia South Asia Electricity Transmission and Trade Project (CASA-1000) is a transformational project with impact in two regions. The project offers an opportunity to alleviate poverty in some of the poorest parts of the world, boosting energy security and prosperity in Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Afghanistan and Pakistan. CASA-1000 will facilitate the first electricity trade between four countries in Central Asia and South Asia, based on long-term commercial contracts for 1,300 megawatts (MW) of electricity transmission between the 4 neighbouring countries. This would be the first step in the development of the Central Asia South Asia Regional Electricity Market (CASAREM).

The design of the CASA 1000 project in Afghanistan includes a Community Support Program (CSP) for individuals and communities located within the 4-km wide and 562 km long corridor who will be affected by the transmission line. CASA Community Support Project will provide grants directly to communities to fund economic infrastructure. Preference will be given to power-sector projects. This is expected to create the conditions for smooth construction of the CASA1000 transmission line, while ensuring sustainability of CSP sub-projects and maximizing the development outcomes for the rural poor.